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MARTIN COUNTY ARREST LIST - MARCH 12-17, 2018

MARCH 23, 2018 - written by WADE QUEEN

 

William Blackburn Jr.William Blackburn Jr.William Blackburn Jr., 34, of Columbus, Ohio; was arrested on March 12, 2018, at 12:51 P.M., by deputy McCoy of the Martin County Sheriff Department, and was charged with: • ROBBERY, 1ST DEGREE.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Herbert L. BlevinsHerbert L. BlevinsHerbert L. Blevins, 35, of Warfield, Kentucky; was arrested on March 13, 2018, at 4:49 A.M., by deputy Aaron Blevins of the Martin County Sheriff Department, and was charged with: • DRUG PARAPHERNALIA - BUY/POSSESS, • ASSAULT 3RD DEGREE-POLICE OFFICER OR PROB OFFICER, • ENDANGERING THE WELFARE OF A MINOR.

 

 

 

 

 

AAnetta F. WilsonAnetta F. Wilsonnetta F. Wilson, 41, of Crum, West Virginia; was arrested on March 13, 2018, at 4:54 A.M., by deputy Aaron Blevins of the Martin County Sheriff Department, and was charged with: • ENDANGERING THE WELFARE OF A MINOR.



 

 

 

 

 

Ked FletcherKed FletcherKed Fletcher, 59, of Inez, Kentucky; was arrested on March 13, 2018, at 11:59 A.M., by deputy Michael Housinger of the Martin County Sheriff Department, and was charged with: • FAILURE TO WEAR SEAT BELTS, • FAILURE TO REGISTER TRANSFER OF MOTOR VEHICLE. • FAILURE OF NON-OWNER OPERATOR TO MAINTAIN REQUIRED INSURANCE/SECURITY, 1ST OFFENSE.

 

 

 

 

 

Michael S. MaynardMichael S. MaynardMichael S. Maynard, 43, of Lovely, Kentucky; was arrested on March 13, 2018, at 12:17 P.M., by deputy Eddie Stepp of the Martin County Sheriff Department, and was charged with: • TRAFFICKING IN CONTROLLED SUBSTANCE, 1ST DEGREE, 1ST OFFENSE - (< 10 D.U. OPIATES).

 

 

 

 

 

Anthony L. McClainAnthony L. McClainAnthony L. McClain. 34, of Flint, Michigan; was arrested on March 14, 2018, at 12:59 P.M., by deputy Michael Housinger of the Martin County Sheriff Department, and was charged with: • FUGITIVE FROM ANOTHER STATE - WARRANT REQUIRED.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thomas SpaudingThomas SpaudingThomas Spauding, 60, of Kermit, West Virginia; was arrested on March 14, 2018, at 4:50 P.M., by a deputy of the Martin County Sheriff Department, and was charged with: • DRIVING ON DUI SUSPENDED LICENSE -1ST OFFENSE.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jonathan B. BrewerJonathan B. BrewerJonathan B. Brewer, 32, of Saint Albans, West Virginia; was arrested on March 15, 2018, at 3:17 P.M., by deputy Billy Patrick of the Martin County Sheriff Department,and was charged with: • TRAFFICKING IN CONTROLLED SUBSTANCE, 1ST DEGREE, 1ST OFFENSE - (< 10 D.U. DRUG UNSPECIFIED SCHEDULE 1 & 2), • DRUG PARAPHERNALIA - BUY/ POSSESS, • FAILURE TO OR IMPROPER SIGNAL, • NO OPERATORS-MOPED LICENSE, • FAILURE TO ISSUE INSURANCE CARD, • GIVING OFFICER FALSE IDENTIFYING INFORMATION.

 

 

 

 

 

Jordan Dean StamperedJordan Dean StamperedJordan Dean Stampered, 25, of Crum, West Virginia; was arrested on March 15, 2018, at 8:12 P.M., by deputy Jerry Todd of the Martin County Sheriff Department, and was charged with a total of 15 felony, misdemeanor, and motor traffic violations:

According to press release reports from the Kentucky State Police and the Martin County Sheriff’s Department, a man from Wayne County, West Virginia was arrested late last Thursday, March 14, after leading officers on a chase over the Kermit bridge in Mingo County, West Virginia and into the Warfield community of Martin County.

The Martin County Sheriff’s Department stated that they were asked to be on the lookout for a red 2006 Chevy Cruise, on the suspicion that it was possibly stolen. Martin County deputy and K-9 handler, Billy Patrick, spotted the suspect vehicle, which then he attempted to stop it and that is when the vehicle sped away. The chase came to an end after the man jumped out of his vehicle and took off running across the Kermit Bridge. Deputy Patrick got out of his vehicle and warned the man that he would release his K-9 named “Grimm.” The man then stopped and gave up to deputy Patrick.

The man was identified as 25-year-old Jordan Dean Stampered, of Crum, West Virginia, who was charged with a long list of offenses. which were the following: • ASSAULT, 1ST DEGREE - POLICE OFFICER, • DISREGARDING STOP SIGN, • FAIL GIVE RIGHT OF WAY TO VEHICLE PASS OPPOSITE DIRECT, • RECKLESS DRIVING, • NO OPERATORS-MOPED LICENSE ( 2 SEPARATE CHARGE COUNTS ), • FAILURE OF NON-OWNER OPERATOR TO MAINTAIN REQUIRED INSURANCE/SECURITY, 1ST OFFENSE, • WANTON ENDANGERMENT-1ST DEGREE, • FLEEING OR EVADING POLICE, 1ST DEGREE (MOTOR VEHICLE) [ 2 SEPARATE COUNT CHARGES ],• FLEEING OR EVADING POLICE, 1ST DEGREE (ON FOOT), • UNAUTHORIZED USE OF MOTOR VEHICLE-1ST OFFENSE, • FAILURE TO OR IMPROPER SIGNAL, • WANTON ENDANGERMENT-2ND DEGREE-POLICE OFFICER, • SPEEDING 20 MPH OVER LIMIT.

Jordan Dean Stampered was taken and lodged in the Big Sandy Regional Detention Center in Paintsville, where he still remains incarcerated.

The investigation into the alleged stolen vehicle is continuing.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Peggy S. MusicPeggy S. MusicPeggy S. Music, 56, of Inez, Kentucky; was arrested on March 16, 2018, at 6:56 P.M., by a deputy of the Martin County Sheriff Department, and was charged with: • TRAFFICKING CONTROLLED SUBSTANCE, 1ST DEGREE, 1ST OFFENSE - ( < 10 D.U. OPIATES) [ 2 SEPARATE COUNT CHARGES], • PERSISTENT FELONY OFFENDER II (2 SEPARATE COUNT CHARGES).

 

 

 

 

 

James Wesley FanninJames Wesley FanninJames Wesley Fannin, 33, of Tomahawk, Kentucky; was arrested on March 16, 2018, at 9:17 P.M., by deputy M. Adams, of the Martin County Sheriff Department,and was charged with: • PUBLIC INTOXICATION-CONTROLLED SUBSTANCE (EXCLUDES ALCOHOL).

 

 

 

 

 

Courtney M. MillsCourtney M. MillsCourtney M. Mills, 21, of Lovely, Kentucky; was arrested on March 16, 2018, at 11:13 P.M., by deputy M. Adams, of the Martin County Sheriff Department,and was charged with: • SERVING 2 WARRANTS (FOR OTHER POLICE AGENCY).

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jody Allen DavisJody Allen DavisJody Allen Davis, 35, of Inez, Kentucky; was arrested on March 17, 2018, at 2:40 P.M., by trooper Mike Goble of the Kentucky State Police-Post #9-Pikeville, and was charged with: • FAILURE TO APPEAR.



 

 

 

 

 

Kody HarlessKody HarlessKody Harless, 19, of Tomahawk, Kentucky; was arrested on March 17, 2018, at 4:50 P.M., by trooper Mike Goble of the Kentucky State Police-Post #9-Pikeville, and was charged with: • OPERATING MOTOR VEHICLE UNDER/INFLUENCE ALCOHOL < 21 YEARS OF AGE .02-.07, • FAILURE TO WEAR SEAT BELTS, • FAILURE TO PRODUCE INSURANCE CARD, • IMPROPER OR NO WINDSHIELD, • NO OPERATORS-MOPED LICENSE.

 

 

 

 

 

Nathaniel PrestonNathaniel PrestonNathaniel Preston, 22, of Inez, Kentucky; was arrested on March 17, 2018, at 5:06 P.M., by a trooper of the Kentucky State Police-Post #9-Pikeville, , and was charged with: • RESISTING ARREST.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Kara SpurlockKara SpurlockKara Spurlock, 21, of Breeden, West Virginia; was arrested on March 17, 2018, at 10:50 P.M., by deputy M. Adams, of the Martin County Sheriff Department,and was charged with: • REAR LICENSE NOT ILLUMINATED, • FAILURE TO PRODUCE INSURANCE CARD, • IMPROPER REGISTRATION PLATE, • OPERATING MOTOR VEHICLE UNDER/INFLUENCE ALCOHOL/ DRUGS/ETC. .08 - 1ST OFFENSE.

 

 

 

March 23, 2018

MARCH 23, 2018 - written by WADE QUEEN


Angela Martcum and Daniel WellsAngela Martcum and Daniel Wells

 

The Martin County Sheriff’s Department arrested two people, a Martin County woman and Johnson County man, early Wednesday morning March 21, on various drug charges and other violations following a traffic stop, according to a press release report .

According to the arrest citation, Martin County Sheriff John Kirk stopped a Ford Escape around 2 A.M. on Gordon Maynard Road in Inez because the vehicle had crossed the double yellow line several times. A female was operating the vehicle, who was identified as Angela Fay Marcum, 39, of Inez.

Deputies say they noticed Marcum had glassy eyes and slurred speech and showed all the signs of being impaired. During a search of the vehicle, deputies found a clear baggy with methamphetamine and a glass pipe. The citation report stated that Marcum told officers she had “smoked meth” 3 days prior. Marcum was taken to Paul B. Hall Regional Medical Center where impaired consent was read, but she refused to contact an attorney and refused a blood test.

Angela Marcum was charged at 3:44 A.M. with the following:• OPERATING MOTOR VEHICLE UNDER/INFLUENCE ALCOHOL/DRUGS/ETC. .08 - 1ST OFFENSE, • POSSESSION CONTROLLED SUBSTANCE 1ST DEGREE, 1ST OFFENSE (METHAMPHETAMINE), • NO REGISTRATION RECEIPT, • FAILURE TO PRODUCE INSURANCE CARD, • DRUG PARAPHERNALIA - BUY/POSSESS, • FAILURE TO WEAR SEAT BELTS.

A passenger in Marcum’s vehicle, identified as Daniel Wells, 35 of Van Lear, was also arrested and was charged with the following: • POSSESSION CONTROLLED SUBSTANCE 1ST DEGREE, 1ST OFFENSE (METHAMPHETAMINE), • DRUG PARAPHERNALIA - BUY/POSSESS.

Deputies said Wells, as a passenger, was in reach of the baggy that was found in the vehicle and was also said to have a syringe in his left pocket. Both suspects were taken to the Big Sandy Regional Detention Center.

Deputy Aaron Blevins with the Martin County Sheriff’s Department, who was listed as the arresting officer of both Marcum and Wells in the citation report, is also the investigating officer in the case.

 

March 23, 2018

JUDICIAL REDISTRICTING BILL GOES TO GOVERNOR


FRANKFORT—A judicial redistricting bill that would add court judgeships in a few areas of the state and remove judgeships from other areas has received final passage on a vote of 63-31 in the Kentucky House.

House Bill 348, sponsored by Rep. Jeff Hoover, R-Jamestown, and Rep. Jason Nemes, R-Louisville, would add family court judges to the judicial circuit serving Pulaski, Lincoln and Rockcastle counties and the judicial circuit serving Boone and Gallatin counties. A third family judge would be added in Bullitt County, where a district judgeship would be converted to a family court judgeship to accommodate the change.

Judgeships that would be eliminated as of 2023 to help pay for the new seats include a circuit judgeship in Floyd County and district judgeship in far West Kentucky. The West Kentucky position would be created by combining two districts – one in Fulton and Hickman counties and one in Carlisle and Ballard counties—into one district.

Nemes said HB 348 adjusts judgeships according to caseload when he spoke on the bill before the House Judiciary Committee in early March. He said the circuits in southern and northern Kentucky which are slated to receive new judges under the bill especially have “a tremendous need.”

“There’s a lot of places in Kentucky where judges are working extremely hard but in those two places – I don’t see how they’re even getting the job done, they’re so overworked,” said Nemes.

One House member voting against the bill was Rep. Larry Brown, R-Prestonsburg. The Floyd County judgeship that would be eliminated by the bill serves citizens in his district.

“I think the numbers were askew,” said Brown. “And I think we’re being unfairly punished in Floyd County by losing a circuit judge who has done nothing but his job, and done it above and beyond the call—having to go to different circuits and take care of business there as well.”

The legislation would also require the Kentucky Supreme Court to certify the need for any changes in the state’s judicial circuits or districts based on an eight-year review of the courts by the Administrative Office of the Courts. That review may be ordered by the state Supreme Court starting in 2020.

HB 348, which was approved by the Senate on a vote of 32-5 yesterday, now goes to the governor to be signed into law.


‘REVENGE PORN’ BILL GOES TO GOVERNOR


FRANKFORT—A bill that would make it a crime to post sexually explicit images of someone online without that person’s consent is on its way to the governor to be signed into law.

House Bill 71, sponsored by Rep. Diane St. Onge, R-Ft. Wright, aims to crack down on so-called “revenge porn” – sexually-explicit photos or videos often used to humiliate the person photographed or turn a profit for the person posting the photos online.

Penalties for posting such an image would be a misdemeanor for a first offense or a Class D felony for each subsequent offense. If the image was posted for profit, the penalties would be ramped up to a Class D felony for a first offense and a more serious Class C felony for subsequent offenses.

Those who post such material could also be liable in civil court, where $1,000 in damages could be assessed under HB 71 for each image each day it remains online after a request has been made to remove it. Additional language would prohibit an online entity from demanding payment to remove the image or images.

While penalties for violators would be serious in many cases, those convicted under the legislation would not have to register as a sex offender under Kentucky law.

HB 71, which passed the Senate on a 37-0 vote yesterday, received final passage in the House today on a vote of 90-2.

 


TAX REFORM BENEFITS COMING TO ‘OPPORTUNITY ZONES’ IN KENTUCKY

‘I know there is a lot of excitement in my state of Kentucky. From coal country to farming communities and everywhere in between, Obama-era overregulation was holding our economy short of its full potential. These opportunity zones offer a shot at real relief. According to our Cabinet for Economic Development, Kentucky may designate as many as 144 new zones, prioritizing growth in areas that need it most.’

--U.S. Senator Mitch McConnell

WASHINGTON, D.C. – U.S. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) delivered the following remarks today on the Senate floor regarding the benefits Americans across the country continue to see from tax reform:

"...‘We’ve been talking for months about the ways tax reform is helping to jump-start the economy, bolster family budgets, and make life better for millions of Americans. Just a few months in, many such stories have already been front-page news: the tax reform bonuses, raises, and benefits for four million workers and counting; the new investments and new hiring from businesses large and small; the bigger paychecks for middle-class Americans as the IRS withholds less of their money.

“But other exciting parts of this once-in-a-generation reform aren’t receiving the attention they deserve. Today, for example, is an initial deadline for states to nominate areas they’d like to be designated as ‘opportunity zones.’ This is thanks to a provision incorporated into tax reform through the unflagging dedication of our colleague Senator Scott.

“The premise here is simple. The best way to breathe new life into struggling communities is not to invent some new federal program. It isn’t to throw government money into one more top-down, tax-and-spend scheme. No -- the best way to help the rural areas, small cities, and suburbs left behind by Obama-era policies is to get the government’s foot off the brake and let free enterprise flourish. It’s to make those communities attractive places to do business, open new facilities, and create good-paying jobs.

“This is exactly what tax reform does, by deferring capital gains taxes on income that’s invested in distressed areas that receive this ‘opportunity zone’ designation. As one estimate has it, three quarters of all the new jobs created from 2010 to 2016 went to major metropolitan areas. Only three percent went to rural America. This provision could help change that.

“I know there is a lot of excitement in my state of Kentucky. From coal country to farming communities and everywhere in between, Obama-era overregulation was holding our economy short of its full potential. These opportunity zones offer a shot at real relief. According to our Cabinet for Economic Development, Kentucky may designate as many as 144 new zones, prioritizing growth in areas that need it most.

“Or take West Virginia. As my friend Senator Capito recently noted, her state understands the problem all too well. One recent study suggests that West Virginia has the third-highest proportion of its population living in economically distressed communities. Opportunity zones will make a difference to her state.

“Of course, so will the rest of tax reform. A few weeks back, Senator Capito reported that Worldwide Equipment in West Sulphur Springs plans to reinvest $8 million into its operations, including more than a thousand employee bonuses -- all thanks to tax reform.

“I imagine West Virginians are quite glad that Senator Capito used her vote to make tax reform a reality. It’s a shame their senior senator didn’t follow suit. It’s a shame he, and every other Democrat, tried to block it from taking effect. Fortunately, this president and this Congress didn’t let that stop us. We accomplished tax reform anyway -- because we’re committed to fighting for all Americans.”

 

Financial literacy bill on way to governor

 

FRANKFORT—Kentucky public school students would have to satisfy a financial literacy requirement before they could graduate high school under a bill now on its way to the governor’s desk.

The requirement under House Bill 132, sponsored by Rep. Jim DuPlessis, R-Elizabethtown, and Rep. James Tipton, R-Taylorsville, would be implemented beginning with students entering the 2020-2021 ninth-grade class.

DuPlessis said before a House floor vote on HB 132 in January that the bill would ensure that every Kentucky public high school graduate is taught how to budget, save, and invest.

“If we want to fix financial illiteracy, we must get away from the notion that it is a privilege to know how money works,” DuPlessis told his House colleagues.

Coursework or programs that would meet the requirement under HB 132 would be determined by the high school’s school-based decision making council or principal, according to the bill. Guidelines for the coursework or program would be developed at the state level with local programs aligned to the state standards.

HB 132 initially passed the House on a vote of 68-24. It was amended and approved by the Senate earlier this week on a 35-3 vote. Sen. Max Wise, R-Campbellsville, presented the bill for a vote on the Senate floor.

“The lack of financial literacy is costing our state money,” said Wise. “When people are deep in consumer debt, they tend to file for bankruptcy more often, they are more likely to need state assistance, and they certainly are not adding to the consumer economy when they send the majority of their spending capability in interest payments to out-of-state credit card companies.”

HB 132 passed on a final vote of 88-3 today in the House. It has been sent to the governor to be signed into law.

 


STANDARDS-FOR-TREATMENT DISORDERS BILL GOES TO GOVERNOR



FRANKFORT— A bill that would attack Kentucky’s opioid crisis through better state substance use disorder treatment and recovery program standards has received final passage in the Kentucky House.

House Bill 124, sponsored by House Health and Family Services Committee Chair Rep. Addia Wuchner, R-Florence, and Rep. Kimberly Poore Moser, R-Taylor Mill, would require enhanced licensure and quality standards for substance use disorder treatment and recovery after a state review of current statewide standards, subject to available funding. Enhanced standards would cover residential, outpatient and medication-assisted treatment (MAT) services, according to the bill.

Wuchner said she has traveled the state visiting treatment and recovery centers and found that some programs have “a lot of dynamics and a lot of differences.”

“That doesn’t mean that every program has to be the same, but there should be components of that program that are consistent with best practices,” said Wuchner.

HB 124 was amended in the Senate on a 36-0 vote late last week to include FDA-approved MAT treatment for inmates who are opioid-dependent or who have other substance abuse disorders.

“As some of those products that are used for medically-assisted treatment come to market and come to bear, there are more products now that could be used in the corrections environment that minimize diversion, and that’s why this piece was added,” said Wuchner.

HB 124 received final passage in the House today on a vote of 93-0. The bill was initially passed in the House on an 85-2 vote in January.


Senate Gives Final Passage to Legislation Eliminating Regulations on Home Baking

 

Heath’s Legislation Will Empower Free Market, Assist Home Bakers

FRANKFORT, Ky. – The Kentucky Senate has given final passage to Rep. Richard Heath’s legislation allowing home bakers to sell products to customers straight out of their kitchens, free from regulatory restraints.

House Bill 263 would put home bakers and other food processors on a level playing field with farmers, who are already exempt from these licensing requirements. Under the legislation, home baked goods could be sold at a variety of places, including roadside stands, community events and marketplaces, or online.

Removing outdated regulations on small businesses has been a key priority of Heath in his time in the General Assembly.

“If an individual wants to engage in free market activity, government should not be seeking to restrict that,” said Heath, who chairs the House Agriculture Committee. “This legislation will also empower the many individuals who would like to provide for their families while staying at home and raising their children. I commend the Senate for passing this legislation free of any red tape, and look forward to seeing it signed into law.”

While the original version was amended in the Senate to require individuals to be registered with the state and undergo a home inspection, that provision was dropped from the final bill after the urging of Heath and many home baking advocates.

Current statutes could lead to someone spending time in jail for selling goods from their home kitchen, a reality remedied in the legislation

Brooke Fallon, Assistant Director of Activism for the Institute of Justice, a group who fought in support of the legislation, commended the bill’s passage.
"With the passage of Representative Heath's HB 263, hundreds of home bakers across Kentucky will finally have the opportunity to earn income for their families doing what they love,” said Fallon. “This is great news for homemakers, hobbyists, and everyone with a sweet tooth."

The now heads to Governor Bevin’s desk for approval and is expected to be signed into law.