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April 30, 2018

NEW YORK POST LIKES E. KY. PROJECT TO REPLACE COAL JOBS 

 

Solar-power professional Jonathan Webb says he will bring about 600 jobs to Central Appalachia with high-tech mountaintop greenhouses Solar-power professional Jonathan Webb says he will bring about 600 jobs to Central Appalachia with high-tech mountaintop greenhouses

AppHarvest  WILL BREAK GROUND 'IN A FEW WEEKS' IN PIKEVILLE, KY.

 

Jonathan Webb of AppHarvest Screen Shot 2018 04 30 at 9.22.53 AMJonathan Webb of AppHarvest Screen Shot 2018 04 30 at 9.22.53 AMSolar-power professional Jonathan Webb says he will bring about 600 jobs to Central Appalachia with high-tech mountaintop greenhouses where workers will grow produce to sell all over the U.S., Salena Zito reports for the New York Post.

Webb, 33, left his hometown of Lexington, Ky., to work in New York City in 2010, and was hired in 2014 by the Army to help President Obama increase use of renewable energy. After Donald Trump's election, Webb said he wasn't surprised that Trump's message had resonated in Appalachia, an area reeling from unemployment, the opioid epidemic and general disillusionment, Zito reports.

Shortly afterward, he founded AppHarvest, Webb says he has raised $60 million in capital from such investors as Hillbilly Elegy author J.D. Vance and AOL co-founder Steve Case.

He said he's tried to convince the executives at some of the nation's largest environmental organization to invest. "I have told them . . . they have a poor strategy in some cases," Webb told Zito. "Instead of campaigning against coal for green-collar jobs in coal country, they need to facilitate investment into the region to build projects."

Criticizing the coal industry is cheap and easy, he said, but jobs are the best way to get Appalachians to support environmental initiatives.

Webb told Zito that AppHarvest expects to break ground in the next few weeks on the first greenhouses in Pikeville, Ky.

Written by Heather Chapman Posted at 4/30/2018 

To see more check out the January Perspectives section of The Lazer or go HERE.

 

April 29, 2018

USING THE SUN FOR POWER, PROFIT IN KY.

More than 60 football fields worth of new solar panels are generating electricity today in Northern Kentucky.

Duke Power put 17,024 solar panels on 60 acres at 352 York Road in southern Kenton County. Duke Power put 17,024 solar panels on 60 acres at 352 York Road in southern Kenton County.

 

Duke Energy unveiled its new solar energy farm in Walton, Ky. Tuesday. Duke put 17,024 solar panels on 60 acres at 352 York Road in southern Kenton County.

The new power plant is off U.S. 25 just south of the city of Walton in Boone County. 

An 11,500-solar-panel farm owned by Duke has also been opened at 922 Ruark Road south of Crittenden in Grant County. The Walton and Crittenden solar power farms started producing electricity for the grid Dec. 14, 2017.

See complete story HERE

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A SIMILAR PLAN HAS BEEN PROPOSED FOR ABANDONED STRIP MINE LANDS IN PIKE CO. BUT NO WORD HAS BEEN AVAILABLE ON THE PROGRESS OF THAT PROJECT.

 

 

 

April 26, 2018

Lawrence County eligible to apply for new grants for road material


FRANKFORT, Ky. (April 26, 2018) – Energy and Environment Cabinet Secretary Charles Snavely announced today that a third round of Rubber-Modified Asphalt Grant funding will be made available to counties for road projects across the Commonwealth.

Counties can apply for funding for either chip seal or thin asphalt overlay projects. Chip seal is a pavement surface treatment that combines one or more layers of liquid asphalt with one or more layers of fine aggregate. Asphalt overlay consists of a new layer of asphalt applied over an existing asphalt surface.

Rubber-modified asphalt contains rubber from recycled waste tires.

Depending on the application, rubber-modified asphalt can reduce road noise, increase road life and reduce long-term maintenance costs. The use of rubber modified asphalt also advances the cabinet’s goal of promoting the development of Kentucky markets for recycled waste tires and reducing the problem of illegal tire dumping.

The Cabinet will perform short-term and long-term monitoring to assess the effectiveness of the rubber-modified asphalt projects.

As a condition of the grant funding, counties will agree to pay for the application of an equivalent area of conventional asphalt chip seal or overlay to allow for comparison between conventional and rubber-modified asphalt.

Funding for this grant comes from the Kentucky Waste Tire Trust Fund, which receives funding from every new passenger tire sold in the Commonwealth. In addition to providing funding for the development of markets for recycled waste tires, the fund also supports waste tire collection events, tire pile clean-ups, and grants for counties to manage waste tires.

Application packets will be emailed to all Kentucky counties. For more information, call or email B. J. Bland at (502) 782-6556 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. You may also visit the division’s website at Grants | Recycling and Local Assistance.

 

 

 

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