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December 15, 2017

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Dec. 14, 2017) – Members of Secretary of State Alison Lundergan Grimes and Rep. John Sims' medical cannabis task force on Thursday discussed the concepts of a legislative proposal for the 2018 legislative session. The legislation is anticipated to be bipartisan.

 

Members of Secretary of State Alison Lundergan Grimes and Rep. John Sims' medical cannabis task force Members of Secretary of State Alison Lundergan Grimes and Rep. John Sims' medical cannabis task force

"In the weeks since we announced this effort on medical cannabis, I've heard the stories of Kentuckians in every part of the state – countless veterans, single parents, grandmothers, Parkinson's patients, and many more," said Grimes. "The stories are real and heart-wrenching. This moment is a gut check for Kentucky. Every elected official has a duty to stand up now and work toward giving people access to medicine that can help them, and I'm hoping every one of us will."

The Journal of the American Medical Association Internal Medicine reports that opioid overdose deaths have fallen by 25% in states that have legalized medical marijuana. The Journal of the American Medical Association Internal Medicine reports that opioid overdose deaths have fallen by 25% in states that have legalized medical marijuana. Medical marijuana is legal in 29 states and the District of Columbia.

The Journal of the American Medical Association Internal Medicine reports that opioid overdose deaths have fallen by 25% in states that have legalized medical marijuana.

In Kentucky, where the 2014 veteran suicide was 10% higher than the national average, many veterans and their physicians say that medical cannabis is the most effective treatment for chronic pain and PTSD. Numerous veterans attended the meeting, the task force's second.

The members also heard from Laura from Scott Co., the mother of a young woman who committed suicide earlier this year. She said her daughter suffered from a disorder that medical cannabis could have helped.

"I'm here for my daughter. I know that if she had had access to medical cannabis, she may be alive today," she said. "I am a personal testament to the benefits of medical cannabis. While dealing with my daughter's death, I have been prescribed high dosages of anxiety medicines, the side effects of which are life altering. CBD oil has helped me cope. It's a natural treatment and I am now completely off those other medicines. In my daughter's memory, I won't stop working until other Kentuckians can have real access to medical cannabis."

Besides benefits for PTSD, significant evidence exists showing marijuana counters side effects of many other illnesses and diseases, including cancer, multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease, Crohn's disease, and hepatitis C.

Grimes reiterated her call to Kentucky's cities and counties to back medical cannabis legislation.

"Medical cannabis can help their citizens. Many are veterans who fighting physical and mental illnesses, get care and relief they need. The people it can help are friends and neighbors. We see them in the grocery store. We go to church with them. This issue has a face and a name for our local officials."

Officials from Maysville and Mason County, which have recently taken official action in support of legalization legislation, attended the meeting. The localities passed a resolution in support of Maysville resident Eric Crawford, a constituent of Rep. Sims and member of the medical cannabis panel.

Crawford was in a car accident as a young man that left him with debilitating pain and paralysis. He displayed the dozens of prescription pain relievers, including narcotics, he had been prescribed and have many adverse side effects. Crawford said he experiences the most relief with cannabis.

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The medical cannabis task force includes members of Kentucky's medical community, including doctors, nurses and medical administrators, as well as representatives from law enforcement and state agencies with regulatory oversight, medical marijuana advocates, and military veterans.

 

Comments  

+3 #6 Lets Do It 2017-12-24 21:25
(This is 1 of 2)

There are no reasonable arguments against it, only personal and/or emotionally subjective opinions and those with a financial stake in keeping it criminalized. Alcohol, tobacco?? Such hypocrisy!

Take a look at which senators receive the most donations from pharmaceutical companies (some from KY are very high on the list). Seems wrong considering the opiate and pill problem we have here, huh?

And we've already been through prohibition once - did we not learn anything???

People against legal cannabis say things like "I don't want my granddaughter to grow up [sic] in a world like that." (Actual quote from a KY lawmaker, on video). This just shows how out of touch these "representative s" are! I'm sorry to bust your bubble Mr. Legislator, but your granddaughter IS ALREADY in a world with cannabis! Cannabis is the most easily accessible drug among high school students. The only difference here is if she does decide to use it, she will have to deal with drug dealers, potentially violent people trying to make a dollar. In such a system there is no recourse for problems or issues to be resolved, other than violence. A cash-only market increases the chances of robbery and theft. And who knows what she'll get from him - since its illegal and unregulated, he could have added other chemicals to increase potency, or that may have been done before he even got it and he has no idea.
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+1 #5 Lets Do It 2017-12-24 03:40
Quoting Job Clasification:
Since when did the task of medicine fall under the jurisdiction of the Secretary of State? #voteherout


Could ask the same regarding state legislators - why allow them to legislate medical matters? Shouldn't your doctor be able to recommend the best medicine that we know of?

BTW most legislators that also hold medical degrees are pro-medical cannabis (think our own Dr. and Sen. Rand Paul).
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+3 #4 Lets Do It 2017-12-24 03:29
A 25% drop in OD deaths in states that have medical cannabis??? Why is that not reason enough by itself to do this???

Then consider the financial benefits we could reap - KY nearly already produces more cannabis than any other state. Think of the taxes that could be collected...no more pension problem. More money for schools. More jobs.

All these benefits are possible and without a marked increase in cannabis use - IT'S ALREADY HERE!!! Anyone can find and buy it today.

People, call/write your representatives about this and voice your support! They will never do this until enough people show support for it!

Go to MPP.org and use their "Contact your Legislators" feature. Its very easy, just enter your zip code and it will pretty much do it for you.

2/2
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-3 #3 Job Clasification 2017-12-20 07:39
Since when did the task of medicine fall under the jurisdiction of the Secretary of State? #voteherout
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+2 #2 Citizen 2017-12-18 14:31
There are a couple of things standing in the way, the alcohol lobby and the pharmaceutical lobby. Legally medical and recreational marijuana would put these two entities out of business in a short time.
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+6 #1 All Good 2017-12-15 23:22
This is all good, but why is it some Kentucky politicians and a minority of citizens still act as though marijuana is something new to figure out. Why not copy California? Medically legal since 1996 and absolutely zero deaths from its use. It should be legal in all 50 states. When you do a side by side comparison between marijuana, alcohol, tobacco, prescription pills, marijuana wins hands down. Alcohol causes tons of damage to society and the individual drinking it, people OD and die on alcohol on a daily basis, from simply drinking too much. Tobacco kills thousands per year and prescription drugs kill and addict daily. Name one individual you know that has died from using marijuana. Legalize it already, and quit trying to act as if it’s something new.
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