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FRANKFORT, Ky. (March 10, 2017) – The Senate gave final passage to a measure this week to expand the state’s broadband access by codifying the Kentucky Communications Network Authority (KCNA). Created through an executive order, KCNA is responsible for managing the Commonwealth’s open-access broadband network known as KentuckyWired. KentuckyWired’s focus is to position Kentucky as a national leader in high-capacity internet services.

House Bill 343, sponsored by Rep. Larry Brown, R-Prestonsburg, will specifically help rural communities that do not have access to a broadband network.

“Through these changing times, internet access is imperative to the success of our rural communities,” said Rep. Brown. “We continue to work to diversify Eastern Kentucky’s economy, and KentuckyWired will not only allow that diversification to proceed, but grow our tourism, advance higher education, improve healthcare access, and better the overall lives of Kentuckians. I commend the General Assembly for swiftly passing this measure and supporting the advancements of Eastern Kentucky.”

Kentucky currently ranks near the bottom of national and international rankings of broadband capacity, putting our state at a major disadvantage for attracting jobs and expanding education. The KCNA, through KentuckyWired, will better the Commonwealth by promoting economic growth and drastically improving our quality of life.

The bill is headed to Governor Bevin’s desk for his signature.

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2017

SOCIAL MEDIA CREATES ECHO CHAMBERS THAT HURT DEMOCRACY, JOURNALISM, SAYS AUTHOR/LAW PROFESSOR

Social media limits exposure to different viewpoints and hurts democracy and journalism, Harvard University law professor and author Cass Sunstein told NPR's Kelly McEvers on "All Things Considered." Sunstein's latest book, "#Republic: Divided Democracy in the Age of Social Media," looks at how social media creates echo chambers, leading to news filters where people only look at news that reflects their ideals.

"You're listening to people who just agree with you or reading news sources that fit with your own preconceptions, it's not as if you just stay where you are," Sunstein said. "You tend to end up more extreme, which makes us get kind of blocked as a society, which isn't good for democracy and which makes it possible for people to see people who disagree with them not as fellow citizens, but as enemies who are crazy people or dupes. And that can make problem solving very, very challenging."

"Well, we're early days, really, still for Facebook and social media," he said. "And so my expectation is that Facebook and Twitter will do some experimenting on this count. It is true that kind of a quick reaction is provide people with content that they will look at. And that might be the information cocoon effect. But lots of Americans have not just a desire to see, you know, what they already think, but a desire to see some stuff that'll be challenging or eye-opening."

Sunstein suggests following people with different viewpoints. He said, "if you're left of center, have a little plan in the next two weeks to follow some smart people who are right of center. And if you're right of center, and you tend to ridicule or contempt for people on the left, follow some liberals. Find some who have at least a little bit of credibility for you. Or make a determined judgment whether you're left or right. See what you can get from the other side. And this is, you know, individual lives, but as the framers of the constitution knew, a republic is built up of innumerable individual decisions. And whether we get a well-functioning system or not depends on, you know, countless individual acts." (Read more)

Written by Tim Mandell Posted at 2/23/2017 11:25:00 AM

 

 From left,  Terry Samuel, Kentucky Science and Technology Corporation chief operating officer;  Kris Kimel, Exomedicine Institute founder; State Rep. Rocky Adkins: Dr. Wayne D. Andrews, MSU president ; Dr. Ben Malphrus, MSU’s Space Science Center executive director; and Kyle Keeney, Exomedicine Institute executive director. From left, Terry Samuel, Kentucky Science and Technology Corporation chief operating officer; Kris Kimel, Exomedicine Institute founder; State Rep. Rocky Adkins: Dr. Wayne D. Andrews, MSU president ; Dr. Ben Malphrus, MSU’s Space Science Center executive director; and Kyle Keeney, Exomedicine Institute executive director.


MOREHEAD, Ky.---Morehead State University has been awarded a $300,000 grant by the Exomedicine Institute, a Kentucky based nonprofit that fosters medical research and development in the microgravity environment of space, for the creation of the Exomedicine Center for Applied Technology.

The official presentation occurred Tuesday, Jan. 31, at MSU’s Space Science Center.

The first of its kind, the Exomedicine Center for Applied Technology will bring together scientists, researchers, entrepreneurs and students to design, develop and execute experiments which will then have the opportunity to be carried out aboard the International Space Station (ISS).

“Morehead State University is proud to be at the forefront of space-based medical research,” said Dr. Wayne D. Andrews, MSU president. “The Exomedicine Center for Applied Technology will allow our students and professors to be a part of cutting-edge experimentation that has the potential to change lives and the future of life science research as we know it. This center has huge potential for MSU.”

“I was honored to include language in the 2016 budget bill that made this appropriation possible. I worked closely with Morehead State University and the Kentucky Science and Technology Corporation on this important investment,” said State Rep. Rocky Adkins. “This type of innovation provides us with the potential to find cures for terrible diseases like cancer, while also creating the type of 21st century jobs our people need and deserve. It’s another important step toward rebuilding and diversifying the economy of Eastern Kentucky.”

This unique opportunity is made possible by the center’s partnership with the Exomedicine Institute, located in Lexington, which maintains infrastructure aboard the ISS to conduct such experiments. Findings from these experiments will be used to improve medical treatments for patients on Earth.
“The microgravity environment of space represents a vast, untapped laboratory for exploring new medical solutions. Our investment in Morehead represents an important step toward mainstreaming this exciting new field,” said Kyle Keeney, executive director of the Exomedicine Institute. “Researchers are already discovering valuable new information about cancer, pharmaceuticals and even tissue regeneration from experiments on the International Space Station.”

Also speaking during the presentation were Kris Kimel, Exomedicine Institute founder; Terry Samuel, Kentucky Science and Technology Corporation chief operating officer; and Dr. Ben Malphrus, MSU’s Space Science Center executive director.

Dr. Malphrus read a statement from Lt. Gov. Jenean Hampton:
“Exomedicine is a fascinating and exciting new field of medicine. It is amazing that within our lifetime people could be shuttled to low-Earth orbit environments to receive medical treatments. Exomedicine is the perfect marriage of science, technology, math, medicine, and aerospace, which presents tremendous opportunities for today’s students in terms of engaging curriculum and practical applications. Breakthroughs in the field of Exomedicine also translates to revolutionary and high-paying future employment opportunities for the generations of tomorrow. The future is certainly bright for Exomedicine in Kentucky.”

The Exomedicine Center for Applied Technology is expected to be fully operational by May 2017.

To learn more about the Exomedicine Institute and space-based medical research, visit www.exomedicine.com.

Additional information is available by contacting Dr. Malphrus at 606-783-2381 or visit www.moreheadstate.edu/ssc

 

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