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April 25, 2018

 

Joseph Alan Stepp was named president in April 1999. He is the first native Appalachian to assume the president’s position at Alice Lloyd College.  During President Stepp’s tenure, the endowment has increased from $12.2 million to $42.5 million. In recent years, the College has been featured in national media such as U.S. News & World Report as the top college in America for graduating students with the least amount of debt and Forbes Magazine as one of the 100 most financially fit colleges in America.   Over the past fifteen years, Alice Lloyd College has spent roughly $20 million on numerous major construction/renovation projects (not counting various other improvements) and technology upgrades. Some of these projects include restoration of two historic buildings, Cushing Hall and the Commodore Slone Building, renovation of men’s and women’s dormitories, major renovations to the Caney Cottage dormitory in Lexington, Kentucky, renovation of the McGaw Library and construction of a Center for Entrepreneurship and Collaborative Learning, and the expansion of recreational and athletic facilities. Additionally, construction is underway on a Campus Center Project, a nearly 20-million-dollar project to further develop and expand academic, recreational, and athletic facilities available to the ALC community.  President Stepp has also overseen the expansion of our business program to include majors in entrepreneurship and accounting, a minor in entrepreneurship and core concentrations in management, e-marketing, leadership, finance, healthcare administration, e-commerce, and management information systems, and has added majors in kinesiology, sociology, special education and a dual-degree in nursing.  Through all of this, the College remains debt-free.Joseph Alan Stepp was named president in April 1999. He is the first native Appalachian to assume the president’s position at Alice Lloyd College. During President Stepp’s tenure, the endowment has increased from $12.2 million to $42.5 million. In recent years, the College has been featured in national media such as U.S. News & World Report as the top college in America for graduating students with the least amount of debt and Forbes Magazine as one of the 100 most financially fit colleges in America. Over the past fifteen years, Alice Lloyd College has spent roughly $20 million on numerous major construction/renovation projects (not counting various other improvements) and technology upgrades. Some of these projects include restoration of two historic buildings, Cushing Hall and the Commodore Slone Building, renovation of men’s and women’s dormitories, major renovations to the Caney Cottage dormitory in Lexington, Kentucky, renovation of the McGaw Library and construction of a Center for Entrepreneurship and Collaborative Learning, and the expansion of recreational and athletic facilities. Additionally, construction is underway on a Campus Center Project, a nearly 20-million-dollar project to further develop and expand academic, recreational, and athletic facilities available to the ALC community. President Stepp has also overseen the expansion of our business program to include majors in entrepreneurship and accounting, a minor in entrepreneurship and core concentrations in management, e-marketing, leadership, finance, healthcare administration, e-commerce, and management information systems, and has added majors in kinesiology, sociology, special education and a dual-degree in nursing. Through all of this, the College remains debt-free.PIPPA PASSES, Ky. (WYMT) - For the next week, WYMT will be announcing winners from the East Kentucky Leadership Foundation's annual award ceremony.

For the Private Individual Award, we went to Alice Lloyd College to talk with a man who has worked tirelessly to have the college recognized in two national publications. And that is just the beginning of his accomplishments.

Many years ago, when Alice Lloyd came to this region, her goal in life quickly became offering children in Appalachia a character based education. Her goal was that they would one day bring their skills and knowledge back home.

Joe Stepp became the president of Alice Lloyd 19 years ago and today, he continues to carry that mission with him.

He says one of the ways he grows students to their full potential is through a work-study education.

"Our students do everything from work in the cafeteria, to cut the grass, they work in offices, they work in the tech lab, the IT department, they're teacher's aids", said Alice Lloyd College President Joe Stepp. "I've got two students that work in my front office out here. And when they graduate, they get a regular diploma and they get a work diploma. And so they're building a resume in their four of five years here on campus."

Stepp says requiring students to work helps them to be better prepared for life after Alice Lloyd. He says it also helps Alice Lloyd provide for students.

"Alice Lloyd College makes a greater financial commitment to it's students than any college in the United States."

Alice Lloyd covers the full cost of tuition for students. Stepp says he also has a system in place to pay for students who continue their education at the next level.

"We track our students. Where are they 10 months after graduation? I just got my report from last year. 96% of our graduates, 10 months after graduation, are in either graduate school, professional school, or they have a job", said Stepp. "Very few of them, and they owe very little, and in many cases, no money, they're debt free. It's just a remarkable model and that's kind of what's kept me here. And that's kind of how you talk about measuring success at the school. So yes, I put a whole lot of emphasis on that."

Stepp does not measure success by individual accomplishments like being recognized by U.S. News & World Report as being the top college for graduating students with the least amount of debt or by growing the endowment nearly 200% and landing the college in Forbes Magazine as one of the 100 most financially fit colleges in America.

He measures success through his students.

"Close to 83% of our graduates do return to Appalachia", said Stepp.

A goal in line with the vision established by Alice Lloyd herself; educate them to come back.

The 2018 EAST KENTUCKY LEADERSHIP AWARD FOR PRIVATE INDIVIDUAL goes to Joe Stepp.

 

April 21, 2018

Rotary visits 'The Lion King' At LMS; Annual Show drawing rave reviews and SRO crowds

Louisa Rotarians gathered at the Louisa Middle school on Thursday, April 12th for their weekly meeting to watch “The Lion King,” a yearly play put on by the Louisa Middle School Performing Arts Troupe. The play is always an exciting field trip for Rotarians and a refreshing break from the normal meeting.

Mrs. Tonya Castle-Burkett, director  and music director, choreographer, acting coach, costuming, hair, makeupMrs. Tonya Castle-Burkett, director and music director, choreographer, acting coach, costuming, hair, makeup

The Lion King, directed by Tonya Castle-Burkett was showed on Thursday and Friday at 7:00 P.M. to packed crowds and Louisa Rotarians got a quick peek at the amazing talent we have at L.M.S. and all around our county.

LMS principal Joey Cecil introduced the play and stated, “I always loved our Performing Arts. And actually, we've had a few students make it big in the field. It is always a good feeling when that happens.”

The school's philosophy is: ...centered on the whole child, understands the social, emotional and physical changes of students this age, places emphasis on developing personal organization systems and responsibility, places emphasis on academic success and offers varied experiences for our children to try new things and succeed.

As always the play never disappoints. As Rafiki says, The past can hurt, but the way I see it, you can either run from it, or learn from it. As the brochure states, KEEP CALM AND HAKUNA MATATA!

The CrewThe Crew

The Cast:


Rafiki…Kassidy Burke
Mudasa… Brendon Meadows
Sarabi…Abby Preece
Zazu… Aubrey McCreary
Scar…Kara Parks
Young Simba… Landon Bays
Nala…Emma Isaac
Sarafina…Kaysey Cooksey
Banzai…Rikki Stanford
Shenzi…Samantha Marcum
Ed…Joey Moore
Hyena…Alex Brooks, Trenton Yaunk, Austin Hall
Timon…Kylie Cramer
Plumbaa…Abby Nelson
Lionesss’s…Sofia Marcum, Hannah Delong, Kynzie Borders, Hailey Jude, Cameron Diamond, Marie Sipple, Montana Frazier
Stage Manager…Paige Holley

Ensemble: Dalelenia Johnson, Mia Bartley, Kynlie Cook, Kinsley Preston, Kiason Ward, Kyleah Ward, Shelbie Hughes, Sara Shapaka, Stevie Smith, Maelee Marcum, Kylie Mills, Katie Jude, Alexa Webb, Kayleigh Parker, Charity Crockett, Nakota Mollett, Ethan Holbrook, Jacob Bailey, Riley Sammons, Jonah Stepp, Christian Sutphin, Jack Harrison, Allyson Hickman, Emma Halfill, Tyra Hammond, Callie Robertson, Breanna Robinette, Morgan Pack.

 

Click picture to see video

Disney's The Lion KingDisney's The Lion King

April 20, 2018

Boys’ soccer, archery for boys and girls, wrestling and dance teams added

FALLSBURG TEACHER SUSPENDED FOR 5 DAYS, RESIGNS

BLAINE – In the regular meeting for the month of April at Blaine School, the Lawrence County Board of Education answered the requests that have been echoing for months with a unanimous vote to approve new sports at the high school level, among them boys’ soccer, archery for boys and girls, wrestling and dance teams.

After doing interest surveys at the high school and some extensive analysis of the costs for the programs, the members of the Board of Education voted to approve the creation of those sports for students at Lawrence County High School.

In other business, the Board heard updates from Lawrence County Superintendent Dr. Robbie Fletcher on the status of legislation regarding education and its impact on local schools.

“On Friday (April 13), a delegation of Lawrence County educators went to Frankfort. We met with legislators and the meetings were positive," Fletcher said. "We met with Representative Bam Carney, who sponsored the pension bill, and it was a good meeting. He listened to us knowing that we held opposite views of his, and we had good discussion even though we didn’t agree on things.”

Dr. Fletcher apprised the Board of the USDA inspection at Blaine, which he summarized as having gone well, informed attendees of the progress of the District Facilities Planning Committee and emphasized that the first priority is Louisa West Elementary School in terms of facilities upgrades/replacements.

Fletcher reported on the success of Operation Preparation, held in March, to help middle school and high school students examine careers, educational planning, and the realities of budgeting. He talked about Lawrence County’s participation in the KVEC FIRE Summit at the East Kentucky Expo Center in Pikeville, and alerted the audience of a potential upcoming special Board of Education Meeting either April 30 or May 1.

Blaine elementary principal Shawn JenningsBlaine elementary principal Shawn JenningsBlaine Principal Shawn Jennings gave the Board and audience members an overview of the recent Blaine After School Activities Program, which featured a special effort to enhance extracurricular opportunities for students at Blaine. Students often have difficulty getting to participate in any sports such as football or baseball at the middle school level due to transportation barriers. Dr. Fletcher read a thank you to the Board from one student who was grateful to have something to do other than go straight home “and do chores.”

Conservation contest winners and art students who created this year’s Kentucky School Board Association Banner were recognized and awarded certificates. They included:

Art: 
Kylyn McDowell
Makayla Greene
Shawn Thacker

Writing Winners
Isabella Keaton
Zachary Blankenship
Laiken Moore
Tamarin Keaton 

Coloring Contest Winners
Hannah Keaton
Dakota Lenz
Nathaniel Boggs

Blaine was also recognized for having 100% participation in the Conservation Contest.

Also recognized were the students that participated in creating the Kentucky School Boards Association Banner. Those students are: 

Isabella Keaton 
Sierra Fulks
Jazsequa Fountain

Kaylee Lester and Jazsequa Fountain, both eighth grade students from Blaine Elementary, won 1st Place in the Middle School category of Biomedical and Behavioral Health Sciences at the ACTC-FIVCO Science Fair. The girls were recognized at the fair and each won $50.00 each.

The Board of Education’s next regular meeting is May 21 at Lawrence County High School at 6 p.m.

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Superintendent’s Personnel Action/Update

April 16, 2018


Hiring


John Turner - JROTC Instructor at Lawrence County High School
Stephanie McCarty - School Health Nurse / Special Needs Nurse at Blaine Elementary School
Melissa Perry - Full-Time Bus Monitor

Change of Position

Sandra Boggs - From Full-Time Bus Monitor to Full-Time Bus Driver

Suspension with Pay

Melissa Edens - Teacher at Fallsburg Elementary School (5 days)

Resignation

Melissa Edens - Teacher at Fallsburg Elementary School


April 16, 2018

Re: Request to the Lawrence County Board of Education for Creation regarding Position and Extra Duty Service Pay

Request the following position be created effective April 17, 2018:
(1) Instructional Assistant at Fallsburg Elementary School (Classified Pay Scale)

Request the following Extra Duty Service Pay be created effective April 17, 2018:


(1) Archery Boys Head Coach ($1200 Extra Duty Service Pay)
(1) Archery Girls Head Coach ($1200 Extra Duty Service Pay)
(1) Dance Team Head Coach ($1200 Extra Duty Service Pay)
(1) Soccer Boys Head Coach ($1200 Extra Duty Service Pay)
(1) Soccer Boys Assistant Coach ($600 Extra Duty Service Pay)

 

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