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June 30, 2011

Thacker was a finalist in talent show at Governor's Cup Camp

Lawrence County 6th grader Shawn Weston Thacker recently attended the 2018 KAAC Governor's Cup Camp for middle grade students.Lawrence County 6th grader Shawn Weston Thacker recently attended the 2018 KAAC Governor's Cup Camp for middle grade students.

Sixth grade Blaine Elementary student  Shawn Weston Thacker recently attended the 2018 KAAC Governor's Cup Camp for middle grade students. 

Students from all over the state spent several days at Bellarmine University in Louisville, where they got a taste of college life, residing in the dorms, learning from experienced educators, and eating meals in the dining hall. 

Students could choose the courses they took while attending the camp. 

Thacker's chosen courses were: Civil War, Composers and Their Works, and Visual Art and Artists. 

Thacker also sang onstage, winning his spot as a talent show finalist at the camp.

His parents are Shawn and Shawna Thacker.

 

 

 

June 29, 2018

All items passed in special session; Supt. personnel update announced

AGENDA

1. CALL TO ORDER

Mission:  Every Child College and Career Ready; A Community Involved and Informed

The Pledge to the United States Flag

2. STUDENT LEARNING AND SUPPORT SERVICES

2.A. Approve Claims and Orders of the Treasurer

2.B. Approve Consent Agenda items:

2.B.1. Per diem and expenses for members present

2.B.2. Contracts and services:

2.B.2.a. Renewal of annual Renaissance Place subscriptions (Accelerated Reader, Star Early Literacy, Star Reading, and Star Math) and hosting services fees: Total: $36,396.76

2.B.2.b. Renewal of Northwest Evaluation Association (NWEA) for Measures of Academic (MAP): $29,425.00

2.B.2.c. Lenovo Chromebooks payment: $60,270.61

2.B.2.d. Letter of Agreement between Lawrence County Board of Education and Tri-State Rehab Services, Ironton, Ohio; athletic training services and physical therapy for high school 2018/19 sports season: $3,750.00 (same as last year)

2.B.2.e. Renewal: PSST AESOP BDIA Annual Subscription: $3,733.80

2.B.2.f. Renewal: PSST Custom Check Template Annual Service: $395.00

2.B.2.g. 2018-2019 Memorandum of Agreement with Ashland Community and Technical College (ACTC) for dual credit program

2.B.2.h. Memorandum of Agreement with Morehead State University for dual credit program for the 2018-19 academic year

2.B.2.i. Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between Lawrence County Schools and Retired & Senior Volunteer Program (RSVP) sponsored by Morehead State University (Drug Prevention/Education Curriculum Initiative 2nd Year for Grades 3-8)

2.B.2.j. Health/Alcohol, Tobacco, and Other Drugs (ATOD) ETR HealthSmart Curriculum; K, 1, 2: $873.53 and high school: $639.99

2.B.2.k. Naviance (College and Career Readiness Platform for middle and high school); July 2, 2018 to July 1, 2021: $27,635.20

2.B.2.l. STRIV>ENMEDIA for VJS Junior Site Licenses for four elementary schools; one year: $4,203.75

2.B.2.m. KDE Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) with Lawrence County Schools for Family Resource/Youth Service Centers (FRYSC) SFY19: $233,600

2.B.3. 18-19 Fundraiser Requests:

2.B.3.a. Louisa Middle School

2.B.3.b. Lawrence County High School

2.B.4. Request: Lawrence County FFA and Fair Board requests use of bleachers from the soccer field for the Lawrence County Fair in July; bleachers will be returned by August 1, 2018; Rick and Melissa Blackburn

2.C. Approve district and student insurances for 2018-2019

2.D. Discuss Vision Statement for Lawrence County Schools

2.E. Discuss/Approve Next Steps in the Nickel Tax Process

2.F. Approve 2018-2019 Preschool Tuition of $200 per month (same as last year)

2.G. Approve Second Reading of Annual KSBA Policy Updates, as follows: 01.0 Definitions; 01.11 General Powers and Duties of the Board; 01.111 District Planning; 01.2 Board Member Qualifications; 01.42 Regular Meetings; 01.43 Closed Sessions; 01.83 In-Service Training; 01.91 Authorization of Charter Schools; 01.911 Charter School Application Process; 01.9111 Charter School Contract; 01.912 Charter School Monitoring, Assessment, and Annual Reports; 01.913 Charter School Renewal, Non-Renewal, Revocation, and Closure; 01.914 Conversion to Charter Schools; 02.421 Election of School Council Members (SBDM); 02.442 Comprehensive School Improvement Plan; 03.11 Hiring (Certified Personnel); 03.121 Salaries (Certified Personnel); 03.1235 Educational/Professional Leave (Certified Personnel); 03.18 Evaluation (Certified Personnel); 03.21 Hiring (Classified Personnel); 03.221 Salaries (Classified Personnel); 03.27 Discipline, Suspension and Dismissal of Classified Employees (Classified Personnel); 03.4 Substitute Teachers; 03.6 Volunteers; 04.1 Budget Planning and Adoption; 04.32 Procurement; 04.91 Financial Statements and Reports; 05.5 Security; 06.33 Regular Bus Stops; 06.34 Conduct on Bus; 08.1341 Essential Workplace Programs; 08.1345 Federal Programs; 08.13451 Title I – Parent and Family Engagement Policy; 08.3 School Calendar; 09.11 School Attendance Areas; 09.12 Admissions and Attendance; 09.1231 Dismissal from School; 09.211 Health Care Examination; 09.22 Student Health and Safety; 09.224 Emergency Medical Treatment; 09.227 Child Abuse; 09.313 Eligibility (Athletics)

3. PERSONNEL

3.A. Approve updates to Lawrence County Schools 2018-2019 Salary Schedule

3.B. Approve KEDC Contract regarding Assignment of Personnel for 2018-2019: $18,000

3.C. Approve to acknowledge Superintendent’s Personnel Action/Update

3.D. Superintendent Professional Growth and Evaluation System (SPGES)

3.D.1. Annual Evaluation: Dr. Robbie Fletcher, Superintendent

3.D.1.a. Capstone Presentation

3.D.1.b. Review of Professional Growth Plan

3.D.2. Approve to enter Executive Session for preliminary discussions relating to evaluation of the superintendent pursuant to KRS 61.810(1)(k) and KRS 156.557(6)(c)

3.D.3. Approve return to Open Session

3.D.4. Discuss and approve adoption of Dr. Robbie Fletcher’s Superintendent Summative Evaluation for 2017-18

4. ADJOURNMENT

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Superintendent’s Personnel Action/Update

June 27, 2018


Hiring

Kimberly Spence - Teacher at Lawrence County High School

Change of Position

Sarah McClanahan - From Teacher at Louisa East Elementary School to District Resource Teacher and Gifted and Talented Education Teacher/Coordinator (effective July 1, 2018)

Abandonment of Employment

Joyce Thompson - Full-Time Bus Monitor

Resignations

Tina Hall - Teacher at Lawrence County High School
Victoria Wechsler - Teacher at Louisa East Elementary School
Kimberly Hatfield - LBD Teacher at Fallsburg Elementary School

 

 

June 26, 2018

National Energy Education Development (NEED) project 

Big Sandy Teachers: A group of Kentucky teachers participate in an energy tour in eastern Kentucky that included a stop at Kentucky Power’s Big Sandy Plant in Louisa. Organizers say the tour gives teachers and ultimately their students a better understanding of what it takes to supply electricity.Big Sandy Teachers: A group of Kentucky teachers participate in an energy tour in eastern Kentucky that included a stop at Kentucky Power’s Big Sandy Plant in Louisa. Organizers say the tour gives teachers and ultimately their students a better understanding of what it takes to supply electricity.


LOUISA, Ky., June 26, 2018 – Kentucky teachers, as part of the National Energy Education Development (NEED) project, visited Kentucky Power’s Big Sandy Power Plant recently to peel back the curtain on operations at the plant and better understand how some of the electricity they use is generated.

The NEED project works with Kentucky teachers to promote energy education and conservation to students in local schools. Karen Reagor, director of the Kentucky NEED project, helped set up this Energy Tour for Educators. The tour allows teachers to visit energy sites in Kentucky like Big Sandy to better understand the processes and real world applications to pass onto their students as part of the NEED curriculum.

“For most people, the generation of electricity is magic,” Reagor said. “The tour helps teachers understand how it’s generated and the resources that are used, but then to connect that with the amount of electricity they use at home or in their classroom helps put the entire process into perspective.”

In addition to the Big Sandy plant, teachers also toured the East Kentucky Power Cooperative solar farm in Winchester and the Green Valley Environmental Landfill in Ashland. They also visited the Barthell Coal Camp to look at the history of coal camps in Kentucky and ARQ in Corbin to see how hydrocarbons are extracted from coal waste to blend with liquid fuels.

“One of the highlights of the tour is to see multiple types of generation facilities,” Reagor said. “It gives teachers a better understanding of what it takes to supply electricity to their classrooms.”

At Big Sandy, teachers wore closed-toe shoes and hard hats that were supplied as part of the energy tour. After a safety briefing about potential hazards they may encounter during the tour and a home-cooked meal to fuel up, they were ready for the tour.

Teachers were divided into groups of eight to 10 so they could provide feedback and ask questions during the walk through. They were given an up-close look at the generating turbines, natural gas pipes, operator’s room and the Big Sandy Unit 1 cooling tower.

The group asked questions about the conversion of Big Sandy Unit 1 to natural gas, the decommissioning of Big Sandy Unit 2, and the mixture of fossil fuels and renewables used in Kentucky Power’s generation needs.

David Mell, plant energy production superintendent, said “The decommissioning of Big Sandy Unit 2 and the conversion of Big Sandy Unit 1 to natural gas were to lessen the expense on the customer after EPA regulations became more stringent on coal emissions.”

Kentucky teachers tour Kentucky Power’s Big Sandy Plant in Louisa as part of the National Energy Education Development project’s summer energy tour. Big Sandy employees describe the plant’s operations as gas-fired electricity generation facility to teachers during the tour.    Kentucky teachers tour Kentucky Power’s Big Sandy Plant in Louisa as part of the National Energy Education Development project’s summer energy tour. Big Sandy employees describe the plant’s operations as gas-fired electricity generation facility to teachers during the tour.

 

Reagor, who said she has visited the Big Sandy Plant many times over the past 15 years, said the most interesting part for her was seeing the transition over time to the current natural gas fueled facility.

“Consumers want reliable electricity at a reasonable rate,” she said. “Often times, what we see or hear can be misleading and to see the process of what it takes to get electricity helps the teachers share that message with their students and other customers.”

Big Sandy Plant Manager Paul Massie said educating the public on the utility industry, especially our teachers who are educating our children, is very important.

“We rely on electricity for many of our basic needs,” Massie said. “It was a pleasure to host Kentucky teachers and discuss the critical role electricity plays in our everyday lives.”
While Big Sandy is operating successfully as a gas-fired plant, about 80 percent of Kentucky Power’s electricity is still generated by burning coal at the Mitchell Plant in West Virginia and the Rockport Plant in Indiana. Kentucky Power is part of a regional transmission organization called PJM that coordinates the movement of wholesale electricity in Kentucky and surrounding states. Kentucky Power works with this grid operator to sell any excess electricity or purchase extra power when needed on the open market.

Customers can log on to www.PJM.com to see the current mix of generation fuels and renewables on the transmission grid. They also can learn more about Kentucky Power at www.kentuckypower.com.

Kentucky Power, with headquarters in Ashland, provides service to about 168,000 customers in 20 eastern Kentucky counties, including Boyd, Breathitt, Carter, Clay, Elliott, Floyd, Greenup, Johnson, Knott, Lawrence, Leslie, Letcher, Lewis, Magoffin, Martin, Morgan, Owsley, Perry, Pike and Rowan. Kentucky Power is an operating company in the AEP system, one of the largest electric utilities in the U.S., delivering electricity and custom energy solutions to 5.4 million regulated customers in 11 states.

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Kentucky teachers tour Kentucky Power’s Big Sandy Plant in Louisa as part of the National Energy Education Development project’s summer energy tour. Big Sandy employees describe the plant’s operations as gas-fired electricity generation facility to teachers during the tour.

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